How to structure the content of an audio guide

How to structure the content of an audio guide

With traditional audio guide devices you don’t have to worry much about the structure of the content: usually visitors type the number of an exhibit on the device’s keypad and receive the corresponding audio explanation.

Most digital audio guides (whether apps or PWAs) also offer the ability to type in a number to reach a specific content. But with touch screens all the content is in full view of the visitor, so with the rise of digital audio guides the structure of the content of an audio tour has become an important aspect to think about. Organizing the audio guide content in the limited space of a mobile screen represents a challenge, especially when there are multimedia elements that go beyond the conventional audio tracks, such as videos, image sliders, etc.

Here a few tips:

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Audio guide devices, coronavirus and hygiene

Audio guide devices, coronavirus and hygiene

As I write this, no one knows when the coronavirus crisis will end. But there is one thing everyone agrees on: nothing will ever be the same. One of the most affected sectors is culture. Especially public places that bring people from all over the world together around their cultural offerings, such as museums, which are currently almost completely closed.

Sooner or later this unprecedented crisis will be over and museums will reopen. But the sensitivity of the public will have changed. Some habits, such as physical contact when greeting each other, will not be recovered overnight. The increase in hygiene measures will also last, especially if, as some scientists predict, the Covid-19 will still be with us for some years, reappearing in waves.

Everything points to the fact that it will be a long time before someone is willing to rest a previously passed audio guide device on their face.

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We just launched the travelling audio guide

We just launched the travelling audio guide

Paying to rent an audio guide in a museum and not having time to listen to more than four or five tracks is an annoying experience. The pressure to make the most of the expense incurred creates stress, prevents due attention to what is heard, and deteriorates the visitor’s experience.

The ideal solution would be to offer the visitor an audio guide that she can keep, and that is exactly what we have been doing for a long time in Nubart.

But today we’re going to explain a new way of selling an audioguide that we didn’t have before.

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Nubart's audio guides are accessible

Nubart's audio guides are accessible

Museums strive to be places that can be enjoyed by all citizens, including those with physical impairments. That is why at Nubart we have conceived our card-shaped audio guides with an inclusive or universal design so that museums can also use them to inform visually or hearing impaired visitors about their exhibits. We’ll tell you how.

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Why we can offer digital audio guides in offline mode without any app

Why we can offer digital audio guides in offline mode without any app

Sometimes a problem is an opportunity in disguise. This is what we experienced long time ago when producing the audio tour to visit the natural monuments of El Maestrazgo (Teruel, Spain) for Nexo Turismo y Cultura. It was the origin of our offline digital audio guides for smartphones that work without wifi and without data coverage. Here’s the story.

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